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Rheostats

Rheostats
Rheostats
A rheostat is a variable resistor that is used to control current. Rheostats are very similar to potentiometers, but they only use two connections instead of three. One connection is made at the end of a resistive element, and the other on the wiper. The rheostat does not divide voltage, and are typically designed to carry a substantial current.

Rheostats are primarily used as power control devices, light dimmers, and motor speed controllers. Because they are large and inefficient, rheostats have largely been replaced by potentiometers in today’s industrial applications. However, because they are designed to handle a significant amount of power, rheostats still have some use in manually controlling pumps, fans and blowers where frequent adjustments are unnecessary.

Rheostats: Learn About Rheostats Here > Rheostats are variable resistors or adjustable resistors used to divide voltage in applications that require the adjustment of resistance in an electrical circuit. Rheostats, like potentiometers, are generally used in applications that demand variable control for higher amounts of voltage.
As a result of the reduction of size and power consumption in many of today's electrical devices, rheostats, are not as frequently found in commercial and industrial products. Rheostats, in large, have been replaced by potentiometers, triacs and SCRs. However, rheostats are still commonly used for applications requiring a large amount of current or high voltage. Common utilization of rheostats include light dimmers, motor speed regulators, arc lamps, pumps, fans, respirators, x-ray devices and medical apparatus.